Beyoncé defends use of Challenger explosion in music video

Beyoncé defends use of Challenger explosion in music video

NEW SONG, NEW CONTROVERSY: Beyoncé, seen here during a Dec. 18 tour stop, is defending her use of audio from the fatal Challenger explosion. Photo: Associated Press/Robin Harper/Invision for Parkwood Entertainment

Beyoncé says she meant no harm. But some people connected with the space agency says her use of a clip from the Space Shuttle Challenger explosion is at the very least, insensitive.

She uses part of the mission control statement in which a ground controller states there has been “a major malfunction” aboard the craft shortly after its 1986 launch.

All seven crew members died.

Initial statements on NASA’s website ripped Beyoncé, calling the use of the clip “inappropriate in the extreme” — and saying it was as bad as using audio from the Sept. 11 attacks or the Kennedy assassination “for shock value in a pop tune.” But in more recent statements said the tragedy “should never be trivialized.”

For her part, Beyoncé says the message of the song was that life is fleeting — and that people should treasure loved ones while they are still with us.

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