GM recalls 7M more vehicles over ignition switch

GM recalls 7M more vehicles over ignition switch

RECALLED:The latest recalls involve mainly older midsize cars and bring GM's total number of recalls this year to over 28 million. Photo: Associated Press

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors is recalling at least 7.6 million more vehicles dating back to 1997 to fix faulty ignition switches as the company’s safety crisis continues to grow.

The latest recalls involve mainly older midsize cars and bring GM’s total number of recalls this year to over 28 million.

The company says it is aware of three deaths, eight injuries and seven crashes involving the vehicles recalled on Monday.

GM says it has no conclusive evidence that faulty switches caused the crashes.

The company says it expects to take a $1.2 billion charge in the second quarter for recall-related expenses.

It is urging people to remove everything from their key rings until their cars can be repaired.

Recent Headlines

in Music

Dee Snider approves of Trump’s song use


The Twisted Sister star gave Donald Trump permission to use the track during his campaign because the businessman-turned-politician represents "rebellion, speaking your mind and fighting the system."

in Music

Adele’s ’25’ continues to smash records


British singer Adele's new album sold a record 3.38 million U.S. copies in its first full week, Nielsen Music said, becoming the biggest-selling album of 2015 in an astonishing feat for an era when artists rarely top 1 million.

in Entertainment

Ice-T and Coco welcome daughter Chanel Nicole


Rapper and "Law & Order" star Ice-T and wife Nicole 'Coco' Austin welcomed their first child together on Saturday.

in Entertainment, Lifestyle

Amazon drone delivery is much closer to reality


Amazon has unveiled what its unmanned drones for package delivery would look like with a video launched on the prototype of technology it announced two years ago.

in Entertainment

With “Star Wars” movie due to land, old toys go galactic


Vintage toys linked to the "Star Wars" film franchise are moving faster than a swirling lightsaber, sending prices of many of them soaring into hyperspace.