Amanda Bynes placed on psychiatric hold

Amanda Bynes placed on psychiatric hold

Amanda Bynes has been involuntarily placed in a hospital for mental evaluation. Photo: WENN

Actress Amanda Bynes has been hospitalized on what’s known as a 5150 hold after starting a small fire in the driveway of a random person’s house.

Firefighters responded to a home in Thousand Oaks, CA around 9 p.m. after someone noticed a small fire in the driveway, law enforcement officials tell TMZ. Police were then called when Bynes was found standing near the fire.

After Sheriff’s Deputies arrived and began questioning Bynes about what she was doing, they determined based on her answers that she needed to be hospitalized.

The elderly homeowner says police knocked on her door and asked if she knew Bynes to which she responded “no.” She says police told her Bynes had burnt parts of her clothing.

A 5150 hold is an involuntary hospitalization for mental evaluation in which a person can only be held for 72 hours.

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