Lincoln Memorial vandalized with green paint

Lincoln Memorial vandalized with green paint

A U.S. Park Police officer stands guard next to the statue of Abraham Lincoln at the memorial in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2013, after the memorial was closed to visitors after someone splattered green paint on the statue and the floor area. Police say the apparent vandalism was discovered early Friday morning. No words, letters or symbols were visible in the paint. Photo: Associated Press/Scott Applewhite

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – National Park Service workers were removing paint on Friday that had been splattered on the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, closing the popular attraction until later in the day, a U.S. Park Police officer said.

The officer said green paint had been tossed on the white marble statue of the 16th president that looks onto the National Mall, and that the memorial will reopen when it had been removed, likely later in the morning.

Park Police detectives are investigating the incident, he said.

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